Digital ad spend defies critics

Digital ad spend defies critics

Two thirds of ad spend in 2019 will go to Google Search, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram, Salesforce’s Digital Advertising 2020 report predicts, reinforcing Google and Facebook’s continued dominance of the digital marketing sector.           Tom Bourlet, search and paid media manager at stag party agrees, adding that Google is still the dominant conversation within its digital marketing team, while Facebook re-marketing and audience targeting “seems to be increasingly profitable.”             Salesforce’s report shows that 27% of brands cite customer lifetime value (CLV) as their top success metric, followed by just 19% who cite impressions or web traffic. Source: Marketing Week Want to know more about digital advertising? Give our team a call on 02921 320 200 or email at...
Tesco shifts focus from meals to their passion for food

Tesco shifts focus from meals to their passion for food

Tesco is evolving its ‘Food Love Stories’ campaign, as it looks to “bring to life its passion and care” for food.     A new TV ad, created by BBH London and voiced by comedian Sarah Millican. It focuses on how all of Tesco’s fresh berries are handpicked and chilled within 60 minutes. To ensure they are “at their freshest” for customers. It moves the campaign on from its previous message, which aimed to celebrate the food people love to make. The campaign will run across TV, cinema, out-of-home, digital, social, radio and all of Tesco’s digital-owned channels and in-store. In the first major interview Chief Customer Officer Alexandra Bellini has done since taking on the role at the beginning of last year. She tells Marketing Week: “Rebuilding trust in a brand is something that takes a long time and we want to do everything we possibly can to earn and deserve that trust from our customers. Since Dave Lewis took over as CEO in 2014. When Tesco’s YouGov BrandIndex score (a measure of brand perception) had plummeted to an all-time low of almost zero following a long run of hitting the headlines for all the wrong reasons. Perceptions of the supermarket have been on a steady upwards trajectory. It now has a score of 23.6. Source: Marketing Week If you need help with your integrated marketing campaigns, then contact our award winning team on 02921 320 200 or email at...
The nation’s favourite marketing campaigns revealed

The nation’s favourite marketing campaigns revealed

From the charming JR Hartley to Cadbury’s iconic gorilla, we look back through five decades of marketing to find consumers’ most loved campaigns. From Hovis’s ‘The Bike Ride’, by renowned director Sir Ridley Scott, to Aldi’s much-loved ‘Like Brands, Only Cheaper’, we have uncovered the nation’s top campaigns for each decade Marketing Week has been published – from the 1970s to the present day – as part of our 40th anniversary celebration. The winners: 1970s; Hovis Bike Ride Sir Ridley Scott directed this now infamous ad, and 45 years later ‘The Bike Ride’ still captures the British public’s imagination, claiming the accolade of best advert from the 1970s, with 28% of the vote. 1980s; Yellow Pages, “JR Hartley” This Yellow Pages ad from 1983 marked a distinct change in direction for the brand, which previously positioned itself as something people turn to in an emergency. It is the winning ad of the 1980s by some way with 28% of the vote, followed by the Oxo family (18%) and Levi’s ‘Launderette’ ad (15%). 1990s; Guinness, “Surfers” Guinness’s ‘Surfer’ was both creatively brilliant and commercially successful. Although not the first ad to launch as part of the brand’s ‘Good things come to those who wait’ campaign, it is certainly the most memorable. 2000s; Cadbury, “Gorilla” Despite not showing any chocolate, this ad featuring a man in a gorilla suit drumming to Phil Collins has become synonymous with Cadbury. 2010s; Aldi Through its marketing, Aldi has made a name for itself in the fiercely competitive grocery sector, as a lighthearted brand that takes pricing seriously. Perhaps the most famous ad in its ‘Like Brands,...
What’s next for influencer marketing?

What’s next for influencer marketing?

We take a look at the latest trends in the world of influencer marketing. Social media influencer marketing has had a rough couple of months. From Pewdiepie’s anti-Semitic slurs, to Zoella’s Christmas controversy and then reaching a peak with Logan Paul’s video in Japan’s suicide forest, their reputations have taken some knocks. However, influencers as a trend, are here to stay. And many are pinning a lot on producing branded content, with 79% saying they plan to create more branded posts than they currently do. “Influencers, by definition, inspire and empathise with the same consumers that marketers seek to engage,” said Liz Gottbrecht, vp of marketing at Mavrck. “They bridge the gap.” Influencer marketing platform Mavrck found that 44% of influencers say creating content is a passion. But, 90% of influencers expect free products or services in exchange for their posts and 63% say they’re looking for monetary compensation. In terms of platforms, Instagram was the top choice for influencers, with 100% using the platform. Also ranking high were Facebook (78%), Twitter (65%) and Youtube (67%.) 2018 is also going to be a big year for brands as they start exploring influencer marketing. Up to 38% of marketers are increasing their influencer marketing budgets for 2018. However, Jason DeMers from Forbes predicts many changes for influencers in the next few years. One of the most important change is a demand for authenticity. He predicts that audiences will become tired of sponsored content and start looking for signs on authenticity from influencers. Wondering how social media marketing could work for you? Give our team a call on 02921 320 200...
Spotify explores new advertising opportunities

Spotify explores new advertising opportunities

Streaming-giant Spotify begins to explore new advertising opportunities through collaborations with Lionsgate UK and Google. The average customer spends 25 hours a month streaming music on the platform. Spanning 65 markets, Spotify’s audience has, to date, created two billion playlists from a library of more than 35 million songs. Europe is the company’s largest market with 58 million monthly active users, accounting for 37% of its total audience. Spotify claimed a 42% share of the global streaming market in 2016; boasting a 95% share in Sweden, 59% in the UK and 41% in the US. Creating 3D sound Exploring the possibilities of extending its ad revenue, the platform is working on different formats including podcast collaborations with publishers like Buzzfeed, sponsored playlists and skippable audio ads. In March, Spotify released its first 3D audiovisual advert. In partnership with Lionsgate UK for the release of the horror film, Ghost Stories. Audio from the trailer was repurposed to give a 3D audio effect, creating an immersive experience. The ad received click-through rates up 50% from benchmark level. DIY adverts They also rolled out a self-service Ad Studio to the UK, this allows brands to create their own Spotify adverts. The advertiser can pick its audience based on age, gender, location, activity and musical taste. They can then select mobile, desktop or both, budget and dates. In more recent news, Google announced that DoubleClick Bid Manager, its demand-side platform, will now feature programmatic audio ads. Google’s adverts can be placed on Spotify, SoundCloud, TuneIn, Pandora, and Google Play Music.  Interested in how Spotify could work for you? Give our team a call...
Are teenagers turning their backs on Facebook?

Are teenagers turning their backs on Facebook?

Facebook has seen a drop in the number of teenage users according to the Pew Research Centre. Facebook was used by 71% of teenagers, the only platform used by a clear majority of teens in the 2014-15 Pew Research Centre survey. In comparison, Instagram had just 52% and Snapchat 41%.                 However, in the most recent survey, Facebook’s share has dropped to just 51% of 13-17 year olds. This means that Facebook has dropped to the fourth most popular platform among the age group; Youtube now holds the majority with 85%, followed by Instagram (72%) and Snapchat (69%).                   Mobile phone usage virtually universal The survey comes as smartphone use amongst teenagers becomes virtually universal; with 96% of UK teenagers able to access a smartphone. “Over a third (37.3%) of UK 15-year-olds can be classed as ‘extreme internet users’ (6+ hours of use a day.)” according to a report by the Education Policy Institute (EPI) thinktank. It also declined in usage, with the most used platform now being Snapchat with 35% of teenagers claiming they use it more often than other platforms. Facebook was used most often by just 10% of its 13-17 year olds.   Facebook retains student population However, Facebook is the most used social media sites among students, with 83% saying they use is regularly. Followed by Youtube (80%) and Snapchat and Instagram with 73%. UCAS’s recent report on Student Lifestyles said, “For the second year running, Snapchat and Instagram grew their student base more than any other social media sites....