How are students are using technology?

How are students are using technology?

What technologies are students using in 2018, and for what purpose? Smartphones Smartphones and students are more inseparable than ever in 2018, with average daily usage as high as 5.6 hours. Across the 11,500 students asked during the UCAS Media student lifestyle there was 99% ownership   The most popular usage (74%) is for messaging friends and family, followed by 54% usage for social media. Just 4% of students use their smartphone for shopping. Tablets Tablets are yet to become a staple in the student lifestyle, owned by less than half of students. Used just 2.6 hours per day on average, tablets appear to be more aligned to entertainment than laptops and smartphones. The most popular use was streaming video (45%), closely followed by playing games (43%).  One key point to make is that among students who own tablets, almost a quarter use them for online shopping. Compared to the 4% who use their smartphone for the same activity. Laptops Laptops are owned almost as exclusively as smartphones, with 98% of students having one to hand. While used less than smartphones – at 3.8 hours on average per day – laptops were the primary device used for online shopping. Desktop PCs, perhaps due to being fixtures of most university libraries and study areas, still command 3.9 hours from students each day, and are also more popular for online purchases than smartphones or tablets. Online shopping This distinction between the devices students are using to make online purchases is indicative of a multi-device shopping experience. Research published earlier this year shows that the vast majority of online shoppers are using a combination of devices,...
Study sheds new light on social media retail campaigns

Study sheds new light on social media retail campaigns

A new study out this week has suggested that brands need to turn social media platforms from “a source of inspiration” into an “actual purchase channel.” Fewer than one in ten UK shoppers claim social media plays a role in buying habits. The research was published by agency UM London. It shows that retailers who focus their marketing budgets on social media and smartphone campaigns might be on the “wrong track”. Consumers still using laptops for purchases In addition, 54% of those surveyed use a home computer or laptop for online research or look for inspiration before making a purchase. Only 38% use their smartphone. The study was conducted among 4,800 adults in the UK. The categories where social media has the most influence are when people buy a new kitchen or bathroom (15%) or beauty products (11%). By comparison, only 6% of DIY/garden centre shoppers and only 7% of fashion/apparel shoppers say that social networks play a role in their purchase. “Brands need to look at turning social platforms from a place of inspiration into something that prompts an actual purchase,” said Glen Parker, chief insight officer EMEA at UM. “Instagram, for example, is great at building engagement but sometimes integrating a purchase mechanic on the platform itself can feel incongruous.”Glen Park, chief insight officer EMEA at UM.  Integrated experiences Parker said one way to do this is to integrate social content into retailers’ shoppable channels instead. For example, having social feedback in the stores themselves or on their websites via reviews, user photos and influencer content. “Developing an Instagram campaign for your brand just because you think...
Facebook announces WhatsApp adverts

Facebook announces WhatsApp adverts

It’s currently a free platform enjoyed by nearly two billion people. But users can expect a significant change in their experience of WhatsApp, next year – when Facebook bosses plan to flood it with adverts. The Android and iOS chat app, which was originally released in 2009, will start to embed paid-for content in the app’s Status feature from 2019.  It comes five years after Mark Zuckerberg’s company bought the platform from co-founders Jan Koum and Brian Acton for a whopping £22billion. Both Koum and Acton later quit Facebook, citing differences with the social media company. Insiders believe they were unhappy that their beloved product – which was originally marketed as advert-free and end-to-end encrypted – would soon host commercial content at the expense of users’ privacy.   Specifically, although the latter will remain unchanged, the men were unhappy that Facebook wanted to share data across platforms in order to customise the adverts. Source: The Daily Mail  What do you think about the prospect of advertising on...
Love Island: inside ITV’s social media strategy

Love Island: inside ITV’s social media strategy

When your show sells thousands of branded water bottles, it has to be doing something right. For 2018, the broadcaster’s social media team are being pragmatic about the platforms they’re using to interact with viewers; decoupling from Snapchat to crack on with Instagram Stories instead.   ITV senior digital producers Kenny England said he believed ITV 2’s Snapchat issue weren’t due to a sudden decline in interest of Love Island, but that the dip was platform-specific, and in part due to the app’s poorly-received redesign. In the first month alone Love Island’s official account has “nearly doubled” its Instagram audience. The page has been using Instagram’s Stories product to direct fans to quizzes, divulge teaser soundbites and share its popular ‘The First Look’ video, which gives viewers a two-minute daily preview of the upcoming episode. While it is pulling away from Snapchat, the show is still investing a lot of resource in Twitter, which England said gives fans a platform to discuss the show, especially its “watercooler moments” in real-time. “Love Island has become so important to Twitter that the company took out a cover-wrap of the Metro on the day of the first episode, just to remind people to use it while watching the show,” he added. Of the platforms Series Four is using, England described Instagram as the ‘perfect‘ one. The visual tone of it, he noted, matches the show’s own attention to visual perfection, which affects everything from set backdrops to the contestants themselves. The partnerships too have expanded from those with [main sponsor] Superdrug and Ministry of Sound that ran during Series Three, to 10...
The battle for top spot: Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook

The battle for top spot: Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook

It’s been a rocky start to 2018 for some of the social media giants! When Instagram began testing adverts, they had just reached 150 million daily users. This month, Facebook has announced they are rolling out the function in the US, Brazil and Mexico. Eytan Oren, CEO of full-service agency Block Party, said his agency tracked 100 brands for two weeks in March and found that 79 of them were using Instagram Stories, while just seven were using Facebook’s version, but a look at those same 100 brands today revealed that seven had posted Facebook Stories in the past 24 hours alone. A year ago, the stories function in the Facebook app wasn’t well-known, or well-used. But now, the function is being used more and more, and the hope is that the ads will be targeted to get people interested in new products and services. Instagram are also releasing new features; the ability to add an image post to your story was added last week, allowing users to easily share content. However, Snapchat is faring less well than the other “big two” after a disastrous re-design earlier in the year. The new offering from Snapchat is the introduction of un-skippable ads and it may not be their best move. Snapchat attempt to appease unhappy advertisers To appease brands that were not happy with short average view times on their ads—less than 2 seconds on average, according to top Snapchat advertisers, the platform has introduced forced-view 6-second adverts. As well as the possibility of angering users, the adverts don’t link to longer videos or e-commerce sites as they did previously....