RAJAR: Q4 2018

RAJAR: Q4 2018

The last quarterly results of RAJAR 2018 have been released, and across radio in Wales, with a couple of exceptions the stations haven’t seen many major changes. Read on to find out how listening figures across stations in Wales and the UK have changed, Local It wasn’t a good quarter for Heart with both their South and North Wales stations seeing reach decrease. Heart North Wales fell 28,000, from 146,000 to 118,000. Heart South Wales fell 19,000, from 482,000 to 463,000. However, Heart South Wales has grown from 444,000 listeners from Q2 of 2018. Capital meanwhile saw their reach increase across their North and South stations. Capital South Wales’ reach increased by 14,000 too, from 210,000 to 224,000Capital North West and Wales’ reach increased by 14,000 from 116,000 to 130,000.. It will be interesting to see if their ‘Capital Cash Call’ promotion has boosted their listener hours in Q1 of 2019! 96.4FM The Wave saw a great increase of 22,000 up from 123,000 to 145,000. Nation South Wales also saw their reach increase by 20,000, from 116,000 to 136,000. Radio Pembrokeshire once again maintained the highest % reach with 36%, The Wave at 30% (up 4%) and Heart South Wales at 24% Swansea Bay (Nation Hits) lost the largest amount of listeners, 24%, followed by Heart North Wales with 19%. Other stations such as Radio Ceredigion, Radio Carmarthenshire and Smooth North West & Wales saw little change. National 48.4 million (88%) adults listen to radio every week, 65% of adults listen to commercial radio. Commercial Radio remains ahead of the BBC for an eighth consecutive quarter with weekly reach...
Netflix attributes strong subscriber growth to Birdbox and Bandersnatch

Netflix attributes strong subscriber growth to Birdbox and Bandersnatch

Although Netflix’s latest earnings saw it slightly miss revenue targets, they over-delivered on subscriber growth despite a price hike in the US. The streaming giant boasted revenue of $4.19bn in the closing quarter of 2018, narrowly missing Wall Street’s projected $4.21bn. It will now introduce a US price hike from $11 per month to $13 in the hope of combating its sliding earnings (27% lower year on year). The streaming service added 1.53 million subscribers in the US and 7.31 million internationally, outperforming analyst projections. Despite the optimistic projections, Netflix stock was down by 2.9% after the call. During the period, the company launched Sandra Bullock horror film Birdbox, and it applauded the global response to the film that critics were tepid on. The company claims the movie drew 45 million viewers in its first week and clarified that it counts a ‘view’ as 70% completion. It does not release figures for independent validation, however, and Nielsen has pegged Birdbox viewership to closer to 26 million. Netflix also launched a bold foray into interactive story-telling in the fourth quarter. Chief content officer Ted Sarandos reflected on the launch of Black Mirror tale Bandersnatch. He said: “There have been a few false starts on interactive storytelling in the last couple of decades. And I would tell you that this one has got storyteller salivating about the possibilities. Want to know more about advertising? Send us an email at [email protected] Want to know more about advertising on video on demand? See more here. Source:...
Shutterstock’s 2019 Creative Predictions

Shutterstock’s 2019 Creative Predictions

Shutterstock’s 2019 creative trends report highlights how visual aesthetics of the past are far from dead, with top trends echoing old styles. The report is based on Shutterstock’s vast archive of stock images and footage, and year-on-year search increases, which the company used to generate its design and visual predictions for 2019. The report names the top three trends for 2019 as ‘Zine Culture, ’80s Opulence’ and ‘Yesterday’s tomorrow‘ – all of which are nostalgically reminiscent of the past. In addition to top trends, the report outlines eight styles which were popular this year. They include, ‘Tempting Typography,”Kawaii,’ ‘Beyond Plastic’ and ‘Colourful Cartoon Art.’ ‘Zine culture’ reflects the imaginative world of photomontage. It meshes the old, raw artistic practice, with the digital capabilities of today, to create a fresh, uniquely undesigned look. According to Shuttterstock’s search history, the term ‘contemporary art collage’ increased by 1376% this year. ’80’s opulence’ has as much bravado as a Culture Club album cover. According to the report, the term ‘chain print’ is up by 731% and ‘elegance pattern’ searches increased by 1060%. Good taste is forgotten and substituted for an ostentatious clash – from leopard print and snakeskin to peacock feathers and gold chains, all elements of the style compete for attention. ‘Yesterday’s Tomorrow’ is an optimistic redux of early-tech that demonstrates that old is new again. The term ‘synthwave’ has increased by 717%, ‘retrowave’ by 676% and ‘duotone’ by 230%. The style reinstalls futurism aesthetics like bold purple, blue and pink duotone gradients, basic vector graphics and dreamy synth music. Discussing the predictions report, Shutterstock’s chief marketing officer, Lou Weiss, said: “Even the...
Ad spend to shift from Facebook to Instagram

Ad spend to shift from Facebook to Instagram

Brands head to Instagram to spend their ad budget in 2019, with more advertisers preferring it over Facebook. Instagram is becoming an increasingly attractive place for brands to splosh some dosh and the numbers suggest this trend will continue into 2019. With advertisers increasingly turning their backs on Facebook’s News Feed and making better friends with Instagram’s Stories. According to Socialbakers, ad spend on Instagram increased in 2018 while decreasing on Facebook, driven by hard-to-rival engagement levels on the photo-sharing platform. While Instagram has a smaller audience size compared to its parent company, its users are far more engaged. Suggesting that Instagram is the go-to for capturing quality engagement within smaller communities. Last year, Instagram posts continued to reach and garner more impressions per fan than its Stories feature (around 15% and 25% more, respectively). However, the volume of brands posting on Stories has quadrupled over the last year, with brands investing 212% more in Stories compared with the previous year. A quarter (25%) of brands’ Instagram ad spend now goes on Stories. This will continue to grow through 2019. As just a few examples, easyJet recently made it possible for users to find and book holidays simply by clicking on a photo, while Spotify, SoundCloud and Shazam are offering their services via Stories. Expect to see more of this integration in the coming months, especially as Instagram promises to enhance its ecommerce features. Alice Cuffe, editor at We Are Social, says while no one can argue that the specialised and detailed targeting of Facebook is appealing to advertisers, when it comes to creative innovation, Instagram Stories has the edge....
Christmas Retailers: winners and losers

Christmas Retailers: winners and losers

In January, the British Retail Consortium declared 2018 the worst Christmas since the financial crash in 2008. Sales were flat, with year-on-year growth sitting at 0%. In-store sales were down while online growth slowed. Consumer spending overall was up just 1.8%, the lowest rate since March 2016. That has led to profit warnings, disappointing sales and in the worst instance HMV going into administration for the second time. But all in all it could have been much worse. And amid the darkness there have been a few glimmering beacons of hope, largely thanks to last minute Christmas shopping and online sales. High street hope Let’s start with the bright spots on the high street. Like-for-like sales at John Lewis were up 1% after the department store stuck to its usual blockbuster spot and splashed lots of dosh on a 140-second ad about Elton John (The Boy & The Piano by Adam&EveDDB). The main campaign video racked up 50 million views on social media – 16% more than last year’s Moz the Monster campaign.  Heavy discounting around Black Friday and in the run-up to Christmas no doubt played its part in the sales uplift, which simultaneously led to John Lewis issuing a profit warning for the year ahead as it is forced to price match due to its ‘Never Knowingly Undersold’ price promise. Commercial over emotional Marks & Spencer, with its “unashamedly commercial” approach, had the opposite outcome, with like-for-like sales across food, and clothing and home down 2.1% and 2.4% respectively but no warning on profit. In spite of the sales dip, it claims the product focus paid off and that customers “responded...
AVoD to pick up speed in 2019

AVoD to pick up speed in 2019

Advertising-funded video-on-demand (AVoD) – think Now TV, Hulu and Sony’s Crackle, as well as growing interest from Amazon – is still very young compared to other media. But, advertisers are fast beginning to see its future potential. Subscription video-on-demand (SVoD) services like Netflix have been garnering plenty of attention as they colonise global living rooms. But, competition is also starting to heat up in for online video ad spend. So much so that it is outpacing other media with spend set to double to $47bn by 2023 worldwide, according to Warc. The expected $23.8bn in brand investment that AVoD will receive this year equates to a 5.2% share of global ad spend, which is increasing year on year. And as a percentage of total over-the-top (OTT) spend (an estimated $68.7bn in 2018, according to Digital TV Research), AVoD will account for 34.7%. “Consumers’ voracious appetite for video content anywhere, on any device, has been propelled by SVoD services such as Netflix. But it is AVoD platforms which present the opportunity for advertisers to marry rich consumer data with pinpoint targeting during engaging content. This is why AT&T and Amazon are exploring moves into the AVoD sector next year, with the ultimate aim of taking the lion’s share of a market expected to be worth $47bn by 2023.” James McDonald, data editor, Warc. AVoD platforms present the opportunity for advertisers to marry rich consumer data with pinpoint targeting during engaging content. Indeed, Amazon kick-started speculation in the summer when it posted a job ad looking for a UK-based executive to lead an ad-funded free-to-air TV offering. An ad-funded platform, Pluto...