The 2019 Christmas adverts have started!

The 2019 Christmas adverts have started!

We can’t believe it’s that time of year again, but the 2019 Christmas adverts have started. Join us as we look at some of our favourites so far… Very One of the first adverts to appear on our screens this year, was Very’s. We think it’s a great start to the Christmas advert season! Argos For the first time in almost a decade, Argos is putting their paper catalogue at the centre of their Christmas campaign. Amazon The singing boxes are back! This year to the tune of Solomon Burke’s classic track, Everybody Needs Somebody to Love. Smirnoff Smirnoff have kicked off the party season with their cheeky advert featuring Laverne Cox, here’s to not-so-Silent Nights! Walkers It doesn’t get more festive than Mariah Carey, who finds herself in a tussle for the last bag of Walkers in this ad. Aldi Will Kevin the Carrot defeat the Leafy Blinders? M&S Featuring the choir from Ysgol Gynradd Gymraeg Llwyncelyn in Porth, Rhondda, Paddy McGuinness and Emma Willis, this advert features some of M&S’ festive offerings. IKEA This is giving us Stormzy-vibes, is there a full-length version of the song? Asking for a friend. Sainsbury’s In this (true) tale, we follow the story of Nicholas the Sweep in Victorian London. John Lewis IT’S...
Streaming catching up to traditional TV viewing

Streaming catching up to traditional TV viewing

Streaming is catching up, but watching programmes on a TV is still the most popular way for UK audiences to watch television. Traditional viewing (which includes catch-up within 28 days), accounts for most TV viewing with an average of 3 hours and 12 minutes per day. However, this does mark a drop of 11 minutes since 2017, and average viewing of streaming services rose to 26 minutes per day last year. Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Now TV…? The most popular subscription video on demand (SVoD) platforms in the UK are; Netflix,Amazon Prime Video,Now TV andDisney Life The number of UK households signed up to these platforms increased from 39% (11.2 million) in 2018 to 47% (13.3 million) in 2019. Two in five UK adults now consider online video services their main way of watching TV and film. Viewers are also subscribing to more than one SVoD service. Main broadcasters hold their share However, despite this, the five main public broadcasters (BBC One, BBC Two, Channel 4, ITV/STV and Channel 5) held their share of viewing at 52%. The decline of traditional TV viewing is most prevalent in the younger age group (16-24 years old) who have halved the amount of time they spend watching traditional TV since 2010. Younger viewers move away from traditional TV Since 2017, viewing by all people of subscription video on demand (SVoD) and YouTube content has grown. The four and a half hours of total video content watched by 16-34s includes three main components: Live TV (83 mins); YouTube (64 mins) and SVoD (52 mins). For the youngest adults (aged 16-24), the most-watched platform...
UK government to hit Facebook, Google and Amazon with digital services tax

UK government to hit Facebook, Google and Amazon with digital services tax

The government will soon impose a ‘digital services tax’ on UK revenues generated by “established tech giants” like Facebook, Google and Amazon. The 2% levy was announced by chancellor Philip Hammond in the Autumn budget today (29 October). It will come into force in 2020 following a period of consultation. The announcement follows on from heavy criticism about the amount of tax tech behemoths pay to the treasury. In most instances they are gleaned from ad revenues – in comparison to their UK profit. How much tax do tech giants pay? Facebook UK revenues: £1.26bn Tax: £15.8m (2017) Amazon UK revenues: £72m Tax: £4.5m (2017) Google UK revenues: £1bn Tax: £36.4m (2016) Snapchat UK revenues: £26m Tax: £360K (15 months to Dec 2016) Twitter UK revenues: £76m Tax: £1.2m (2015) Without going into detail, Hammond said the levy wouldn’t apply to “small UK startups.” But instead be targeted at profitable digital services companies that generate “at least £500m a year in global revenue”. Kill or cure?  Ahead of the announcement, IAB chief executive Jon Mew argued that such a levy risked harming the UK digital ad market. “While the government has said it wants to focus new measures on larger businesses, it would be difficult to avoid collateral damage across the sector and a negative effect on competition,” Mew warned. “A tax on revenue would create a disincentive for competitors to set up and grow in the UK market. And would impact on mid-market players who drive competition and provide choice.” Mew suggested that if the government was truly committed to leading the charge on innovation-friendly regulation that supports the growth of the tech sector then...