How has the UK’s media consumption changed since lock-down began?

How has the UK’s media consumption changed since lock-down began?

It’s been almost two months since our first blog about how the coronavirus has affected the UK advertising industry, so we thought it was a good moment to take a look at how things stand in May 2020. Television Across the major channels, television viewing has grown massively since lock-down was introduced in the UK. Sky viewing has increased by 24%, taking the average time spent watching TV per day to 3 hours 40 minutes, that’s an increase of 5 hours per week since lockdown began. Younger audiences have seen the biggest increases in television viewing, 16-24 year olds were watching 57% more TV now than they were this time last year. Unsurprisingly, as more of us are at home, daytime viewing has increased by 39%. Viewers are tuning into the news and light entertainment more than any other genre. Gordon, Gino and Fred: American Road Trip concluded with 4.0m viewers, which was up 1.4 million viewers compared to the slot last year. Video on Demand ITV Hub has seen viewing hours increase by 82%, with catch-up viewing across drama up 26% year on year. Sky On Demand was also up by 52%. Likewise, All 4 achieved its highest number of quarterly views ever across Q1 of 2020. This record breaking period includes All 4’s biggest ever month, week and day of viewing in March, with viewing up 37% year on year. Video on demand platforms also remain popular with a younger audience, viewing was up 30% among 16-34 year olds, with almost 80% of all 16-34s registered with All 4 in the UK. Radio From our previous blogs...
How are our television viewing habits changing?

How are our television viewing habits changing?

Since the outbreak of coronavirus in the UK, and the following government restrictions, TV viewing has increased by 24%, according to BARB. Viewing figures increase across the board Television viewing year-on-year is up across every age from 15-75+ years however, younger audiences have seen the biggest increases with the largest jump with those aged 16-24 years old (+65%). 26-34 year olds and 35-44 year olds have increased by 51% and 44% respectively (Sky). Daytime television commute When we compare pre and post lockdown, ‘working hours’ during weekdays have seen the biggest levels of growth overall, with daytime (0600-1859) growing +16% and lunchtime (1200-1359) growing +31% overall (ITV). Sharing is caring (and good news for advertisers too) Our viewing habits are changing across the board. BARB data shows that shared TV viewing (multiple people watching one TV) has grown by 37% since lockdown began, versus a 15% increase in watching TV alone. We looked into the increase in shared viewing and the benefits for advertisers in a previous blog . Shared viewing is a positive experience and broadcaster-video-on-demand (BVOD) Platforms such as ITV Hub, All 4, 5oD) delivers a highly ‘absorbed’ viewing situation, something which produces greater happiness and engagement with the content. This in turn can have a halo effect on the brands investing in BVOD and result in them being viewed in a more positive light, and with greater brand impact Viewers return to nostalgic TV moments There are also been a resurgence in nostalgic viewing as people try to ‘escape from reality’ through light-hearted entertainment. This has been reflected in the viewing numbers.  Since the start of...
How audio listening is changing

How audio listening is changing

How have our listening habits changed with our new lifestyles? The way in which we consume audio media has changed. The below diagram from DAX shows how before coronavirus we would have listened to the radio while we ate breakfast, then perhaps streamed a podcast or music on our commute, before settling into commercial radio at our place of work. On our commute home we may have streamed music or a podcast again, before streaming once more while at the gym, and then finishing perhaps with another podcast or the radio. However, with our commutes cut down to the living room, and the gyms closed – how has this affected our listening habits? Commercial Radio 38% of commercial radio listeners are tuning in for an extra hour and 45 minutes each day since lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic, as they adjust to spending more time at home. These listeners are now tuning in for an average of 26 hours every week, compared the average time spent listening of around 14 hours a week prior to the health crisis. Radiocentre The research from Radiocentre shows that the driving audience behind the surge in radio listening are those who would previously have listened during their commute and work day. 45% of this group are listening to more radio now – on average for an additional two hours each day.  Reasons cited for the extra listening include: keeping in touch with the outside world (90%)keeping them informed (89%)keeping them company (84%)radio delivers trusted news (68%)they trust the radio more than other news sources (51%) Why add radio into your marketing plans? Adding...
Our normal is changing, how can your brand change with it?

Our normal is changing, how can your brand change with it?

Our culture is quickly adapting to this new state of normal, as our economy and businesses slow down, so do we. What we want to get out of businesses and brands we connect with is also changing, and the way you communicate with your customers should change too. In this blog, we look at how to strike the right tone and remain relevant during these difficult times. What is the ‘new normal’? As businesses across the country slow down, most of the population are experiencing a cultural shift from busy to ‘paused.’ Brands are also having to adapt to new roles, smaller roles and, for some, unexpected larger roles. Brewdog, a beer brewing company based in Wales, have begun manufacturing hand sanitiser. While flights companies like Easy Jet and British Airways have totally or partially shut down their routes. On the other hand, brands such as Zoom (a video call programme) and Houseparty (a social app), have experienced huge increases in their usage. In 2020 so far, Zoom has had 2.2 million new users, more than the 1.9 million they accrued in the whole of 2019 (CNBC). Recently, brands have gotten behind the ‘stay at home’ mantra with efforts to re-focus it to ‘be safe at home.’ How is the ‘new normal’ affecting our needs? In a survey by ITV, they identified four core human needs: Social connection – the need to be togetherIdentity – the need to work out who we are in relation to othersAbility – the need to develop and learnPleasure – the need to feel good and have fun When these needs are affected, we...